Good morning and happy Monday!

This week we'll take a look into weather systems on Jupiter and the latest pictures from Juno! 

If you've seen pictures of Jupiter, you'll notice the different colorations, particularly in bands of white, yellows, and browns that go across the gigantic gas planet. These bands each have their own chemistry, mainly depending on how much ammonia is in that cloud band. The lighter bands (called "zones") are also at a higher altitude than the darker bands (called "belts"). 

There are storms on Jupiter! Lots of them, and each very powerful compared to our Earth. Can you imagine 223.6 mph winds on the entire planet? (Fun fact: the fastest recorded wind speed on Earth was approximately the same speed during a cyclone in Australia!) Lightning can arise by the water in the atmosphere changing polarity, which creates a charge for the lightning. However, Jupiter lightning is considered to be thousands of times more powerful than Earth's. And, of course, we all know about the Big Red Spot- so large that 3 Earths can fit inside. 

Juno, the recent probe to image Jupiter, has made it on July 2016. Images started to pour in immediately and in August, 2016- the first images of the North and South pole of Jupiter were taken! These images are baffling gas giant experts in that the storm systems at the poles are very chaotic than expected! For what Juno is, refer to the previous post (July 25) of what is yet to come from Juno's exploration!

Jupiter's North Pole as imaged by Juno 48,000 miles up from the planet! Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Jupiter's North Pole as imaged by Juno 48,000 miles up from the planet! Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Jupiter's South Pole! Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Jupiter's South Pole! Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Thank you for reading and see you next week for a brief section of what in the world is the Yarkovsky Effect?