Pavilion Lake underwater laboratory. Image credit: http://www.pavilionlake.com/analogue-research

Pavilion Lake underwater laboratory. Image credit: http://www.pavilionlake.com/analogue-research

Welcome back, people of Earth!

As I stated before, our planet is a magnificent playground for science! By learning from our planet's geology and interactions of surface and sky can we figure out what in the world is going on on other planetary surfaces! Be sure to check out previous blogs for Part 1 and Part 2!

1-Pavilion Lake, Canada: Home of the Pavilion Lake Research Project through the partnership with CSA and NASA, Pavilion Lake is home to some of the earliest forms of life (~2.5 billion years), mainly microbes in harsh conditions. This underwater laboratory is useful for ancient astrobiology studies. 

2-Trinidad: Several dozen mud volcanoes have been studied in the southern region of Trinidad as a means for comparison of possible mud volcanoes found on Mars. Mud volcanoes could potentially harbor microbial life in their warm subsurface environments. 

3-Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, Utah: This site provides insight to the formations of different shaped and active dune fields and directional winds to compare to Martian sand dunes. 

4-Concordia, Antarctica: While mostly being used as a psychological and fitness study for isolation studies, Antarctica provides a fantastic wonderland of glaciology, atmospheric studies, and radiative astronomy. 

Thank you for reading and tune in next week for some star quake action!

Pink Coral Sand Dunes State Park in Utah. Image credit: Utah.com

Pink Coral Sand Dunes State Park in Utah. Image credit: Utah.com