Cassiopeia A supernova remnant as imaged by Chandra! Each color corresponds to a particular element! Image credit: NASA/CXC/JHUAPL

Cassiopeia A supernova remnant as imaged by Chandra! Each color corresponds to a particular element! Image credit: NASA/CXC/JHUAPL

Hello hello hello!

X-rays in space is a window into the dynamics of the universe- mainly through intense radiation signatures. Luckily, Earth does not receive x-rays directly onto the ground by the Sun because of our protective atmosphere! In space, however, x-rays are everywhere in some of the most extraordinary explosive regions in the universe. The observatory that helps us make these discoveries is the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Launched in 1993, Chandra must escape Earth's atmosphere, but still be in its gravitational hold to save on fuel. Chandra is located at an altitude of 86,500 miles!

Here are some more fascinating adventures of Chandra:

1-Just posted yesterday on Twitter, Chandra is observing protostars (very early developing stars) in Orion nearly 6,400 light years away!

2-Cassiopeia A, a massive supernova remnant, was observed by Chandra to be million of degrees in radiative heat!

3-Chandra hopes to help with the Gravitational Wave research by looking at very distant objects and "bending" of x-rays!

4-Chandra just recently discovered that some galaxies may house more than 1 black hole! Very exciting stuff!

5-Chandra pointed at Pluto during the New Horizons fly-by and surprisingly found that Pluto is interacting with the solar wind, glowing a little from x-ray radiation!

Pluto as seen by New Horizons (left) and Chandra (right). Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/JHUAPL/R.McNutt et al; Optical: NASA/JHUAPL   

Pluto as seen by New Horizons (left) and Chandra (right). Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/JHUAPL/R.McNutt et al; Optical: NASA/JHUAPL   

Thank you for reading! Happy holidays and come back in the New Year for more exciting SPACE!!!!