Evolution of vapor tails of 67P through the Rosetta mission. Image credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Evolution of vapor tails of 67P through the Rosetta mission. Image credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Good morning, Earthlings!

This week is a special look at Comet 67P from the Rosetta mission. Although the mission has ended in late 2016, images are still being processed and data results are pouring in!

Here are some amazing details about this interesting comet:

1- This comet is called a "Jupiter Family Comet" (JFC) due to its orbit reaching within the bounds of Jupiter's orbit, whereas most comets are beyond any planetary orbit. 

2- The Rosetta mission is part of the European Space Agency. Rosetta rendezvoused with the comet, then sent a small lander named Philae, being the first spacecraft to land on the comet. Unfortunately, Philae landed in a shadowed region and could not maintain its solar battery life for very long.

3- At its longest and widest dimensions, it is only 2.7 by 2.5 miles, respectively.

4- 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is named after two Soviet astronomers who discovered the comet via glass plates

5- There are varying regions of different textures- ranging from extremely smooth to rocky, bouldering chunks.

6- Work is currently in two-fold: "surface processes and building" and "vaporization/sublimation"

7- Vapor tails are being studied through different times of the Rosetta mission

8- Surface process research includes how the surface may change during the Rosetta mission

 Imhotep region on Comet 67P. Image credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Imhotep region on Comet 67P. Image credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Thank you for reading and come back next week for a look at White Dwarf Planets