NGC 1275 Type I Seyfert Galaxy. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

NGC 1275 Type I Seyfert Galaxy. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

Here's to another week in 2018! Let's chat about Seyfert Galaxies...

Seyfert Galaxies are in the category of "active galaxies" along with quasars. Both are very luminous, distant, and with intense radiation. Seyfert Galaxies, however, have a clear host galaxy!

To the telescope, Seyfert Galaxies look like young spiral galaxies. But looking at these through multiple wavelengths reveals that Seyfert galaxy cores could be as large as the Milky Way! WOW!

Seyfert galaxies make up about 10% of all galaxies and are considered one of the most highly studied astronomical objects. 

There are two main types of Seyferts- Type I and Type II- depending on the wavelengths and compositions seen in emission spectroscopy. Type I are mainly very bright in the xray and ultraviolet wavelengths, whereas Type II is mainly in the infrared and visible. 

 NGC 3081 Type II Seyfert Galaxy. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

NGC 3081 Type II Seyfert Galaxy. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

Thank you for reading and come back next week for a look at paleolakes on Mars!