Bedin 1 Dwarf Galaxy located behind a bright globular cluster! News release ID:  STScI-2019-09  Image credit:  NASA ,  ESA , L. Bedin (Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy), and Digitized Sky Survey 2

Bedin 1 Dwarf Galaxy located behind a bright globular cluster! News release ID: STScI-2019-09 Image credit: NASA, ESA, L. Bedin (Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy), and Digitized Sky Survey 2

Hello, Earthlings! Let’s see what the Hubble Space Telescope has been up to, shall we?

Seems like the Hubble Space Telescope has recently involved an international team of astronomers to discover a lone dwarf galaxy that has never been seen before!

Let’s take a look at Bedin 1…(Bedin is the lead astronomer of this study!)

In space, everything from stars to galaxies are all over the place. But from a single standpoint, like on Earth, or the Hubble Space Telescope taking pictures, objects tend to block other objects, like photo-bombing!

This happened when astronomers used Hubble to photograph the globular star cluster NGC 6752 (located 13,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's amorphous halo-center). From those images, a never-before-seen dwarf galaxy was found far behind the cluster’s bright starry population. Turns out, this lone, hidden galaxy is in our own “cosmic backyard”, only 30 million light-years away (approximately 2,300 times farther than the globular cluster).

From HubbleSite News: “The object is classified as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy because it measures only around 3,000 light-years at its greatest extent (barely 1/30th the diameter of the Milky Way), and it is roughly a thousand times dimmer than the Milky Way. Because of its 13-billion-year-old age, and its isolation — which resulted in hardly any interaction with other galaxies — the dwarf is the astronomical equivalent of a ‘living fossil’ from the early universe. “

Thank you for reading and come back next week for a look at the Uranian moon, Miranda!